Law Office of JoJene E. Mills, P.C.
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Posts tagged "Hospital Negligence"

Will your surgeon tell you (s)he made an error?

When you undergo a surgical procedure at an Arizona hospital, you put your life in the hands of your surgeon and the other operating room doctors, nurses and ancillary personnel. You expect all of them to possess the necessary skill and experience to operate on you and make you better. The last thing you expect is for one of them, particularly your surgeon, to make a mistake that could result in your injury or death.

Can miscommunication lead to medical mistakes?

As in any industry in the United States, communication is critical. Yet, when peoples’ lives are at stake, communication takes on even more importance. When you go to see a medical professional, you may be given a diagnosis, require a surgical procedure, need to have labs taken or need a prescription for medication to treat your condition. Your medical information may be traveling between physicians, surgeons, nurses, medical assistants, pharmacists and other medical professionals. During each transfer, there is room for error, and a simple misinterpretation or miscommunication can lead to an error that could leave you significantly harmed or cause death.

3 common anesthesia errors

Going under anesthesia is a serious concern for many patients across Arizona, and if you are among them, you may find yourself preoccupied with all the “what ifs” that could potentially happen because of your anesthesia treatment. At the Law Office of Jojene E Mills, P.C., we recognize that serious, and in some cases, potentially life-threatening situations can arise because physicians make anesthesia errors, and we have helped many patients who suffered injury because of a medical provider’s negligence or mistake pursue appropriate recourse.

What is patient dumping?

If you visit the hospital, the last thing you would expect is to be escorted off the premises while you are disoriented and have no way to contact anyone for a ride home. Sadly, this is a common occurrence for patients in Arizona and across the country, despite it being an uncompassionate, dangerous and even illegal act.

Do medical instruments get left behind?

Every year, thousands of Americans enter operating rooms in hospitals and outpatient clinics across the country. If you have gone into an operating room for a surgical procedure, you know how it feels to place your life in the hands of medical professionals. You may trust that they have the education and knowledge necessary to accurate perform your procedure and help you through the healing process. Surprisingly, surgeons and surgical staff make a number of errors in the operating room, pointing to gross medical negligence. This involves leaving foreign objects behind in patients’ surgical sites. These mistakes are often called ‘never-events’ because they should never happen if proper protocol and procedures are followed.

The new superbug yeast that acts like bacteria

At the Law Office of JoJene E. Mills, PC, in Arizona, we help people who suffer the ill effects of medical malpractice. We therefore thought we should warn you about a new superbug that is spreading around the world. As Wired.com reports, Candida auris is a superbug yeast that first appeared on epidemiologists’ radar in 2009 when a 70-year-old Tokyo hospital patient developed a stubborn ear infection that turned out to be a new type of yeast infection. At about the same time, two South Korean patients ultimately died when the new yeast invaded their bloodstreams.

What are hospital-acquired infections?

When you become a patient in an Arizona hospital or other health care facility, the last thing you expect is that you will get an infection while there. Nevertheless, that is exactly what you risk, especially if your hospital stay requires time in the intensive care unit where medical professionals treat patients who have the most serious diseases. HealthLine reports that you have a one in ten chance of contracting an HAI every time you are admitted to the hospital.

What must I prove in a medical malpractice case?

When you go to see an Arizona doctor or other health care professional, or when (s)he admits you to the hospital, you expect that these medical professionals have the requisite knowledge, skill and experience to properly diagnose your condition and treat it appropriately. The last thing you expect is that someone in whose hands you placed your health and in whom you placed your faith and trust will injure you or make you sicker than you were before you consulted him or her. Sadly, however, medical errors occur at a rather alarming rate, and when they do, you can sue the doctors, nurses and others who caused your injury, as well as the hospital for which they work.